5 Proven Cheapest Ways to Remove Iron from Well Water

Cheapest ways to remove iron from well water. If you’re like most people, you probably take your well water for granted. You turn on the faucet, and outcomes fresh, clean water – no problem.

However, if you have elevated iron levels in your well water, that’s not always the case.

Fortunately, there are several ways to remove iron from well water so that you can enjoy your perfect glass of cold water once again. Keep reading to learn more on the cheapest ways to remove iron from well water!

7 Effective Ways – Cheapest Ways to Remove Iron from Well Water

1. Use A Water Filter

water filter to remove iron from well water

If you’re looking for the cheapest way to remove iron from well water, look no further than installing a point-of-use or whole house water filter.

These come in several different types – including under-sink filters, faucet filters, and showerhead filters – so you can choose whatever is best for your home.

Most filters use activated carbon to remove contaminants, including iron, from your water. And while they may not get rid of all the iron in your water, they will reduce the amount, making it safer and more pleasant to drink.

2. Use A Sand Filter

Another popular way to remove iron from well water is installing a sand filter after the primary filtration system or directly at the entry point.

Sand filters are highly effective at removing both iron and rust particles, so they’re an excellent choice if scale buildup is also an issue at your home or.

Again, you’ll want to take a look at the following options:

Iron Removal Filter – this system is installed after your primary water filter. It consists of an acid tank, water softener salt (for calcium), media tank, high capacity iron filter bed, and post-filter. It can remove up to 50 ppm of iron from well water.

Activated Carbon Filter – also called ” granular activated carbon” or GAC filters, can remove particles as small as 1 micron in size. They’re proven effective against numerous organic compounds, chlorine odors, and tastes, bad tastes, colors, and hydrogen sulfide gas.

Ozone Generator – if you have low iron levels over 20 ppm in your source water, you should consider using an ozone generator. This device uses ozone gas to destroy organic materials, including iron, manganese, and sulfur.

3. Use A Water Softener

If you’re looking for an easy and affordable way to remove both iron and hardness from your well water, then you should consider installing a water softener.

As we mentioned earlier, there are two types of water softeners on the market today: the first type removes calcium and other minerals from your source water (usually by ion exchange), while the second type exchanges the calcium (hardness) in your source water with sodium, just like table salt does.

Types of Water Softener

There are two types of water softeners on the market today. The first type removes the excess calcium, magnesium, and iron from your source water, making it virtually pure.

This is an excellent option if you have high levels of both iron and other minerals that cause scale buildup. However, if you have iron as a problem element alone, then there’s another type of water softener you should look for.

The second water softener exchanges the calcium (hardness) in your source water with sodium, just like table salt does. This makes your hard water into soft water that’s much more gentle on your skin and hair while also giving you better-tasting tea, coffee, and other beverages.

4. Use Vitamin C

vitamin c to remove iron from well water

Another common way to naturally remove iron from your healthy water is by adding Vitamin C powder. Before you go out and buy a whole bunch of this stuff, though, keep in mind that it only works for low levels of iron (less than 10 ppm).

And even then, it won’t last forever – after about 48 hours or so, the reaction of the underground mineral particles with Vitamin C will stop working. Thanks to its natural chelating properties, Vitamin C has been found to have remarkable rust removal abilities.

The easiest and most effective way to use Vitamin C powder as a water iron filter is to mix it with diatomaceous earth (DE). You can then dump the mixture into your water source through an easily accessible faucet. If you don’t have any DE on hand, you can also use plain sand as an alternative.

What You Need to Do

  1. Put about 5 gallons of water into a bucket.
  2. Add 1/2 cup of Vitamin C powder.
  3. Mix well – make sure that all the lumps are gone.
  4. Stir in 8 ounces of DE or sand.
  5. Leave it overnight before using.
  6. Add more DE every 24 hours until the rust particles are no longer red.

5. Use Activated Carbon

If you’d instead not use chemicals to treat your well water, then you might want to turn towards high-quality activated carbon filters.

They’re capable of removing particles as small as 1 micron in size, making them perfect for dealing with iron, manganese, and other particles that fall into this category.

To be more precise, they are 99 percent effective against chlorine, bad tastes, and odors – including hydrogen sulfide gas.

What You Need to Do

1. Add activated carbon to your water source – you can do this by pouring it into a filter housing or by using an inline unit.

2. The higher the quality of the activated carbon, the better it will work.

3. Replace the activated carbon every 1-3 months, depending on how often you use your water source.

4. If you have high iron levels in your source water, consider using a combination of activated carbon and ozone treatment for best results.

FAQs

1. Is it safe to use Vitamin C powder as a water softener?

Well, if you have high levels of iron in your source water, then the answer is that no, you shouldn’t use Vitamin C powder to remove it. Why? Because when Vitamin C dissolves in water, it turns into a mineral known as calcium oxalate – which is rust!

In other words, the natural way to remove iron from your source water won’t work if you have high levels of it. But instead of throwing out the Vitamin C powder, you should try using activated carbon instead. It’ll do a much better job at filtering all those pesky rust particles out of your water.

2. What’s the difference between a water softener and a water filter?

A water softener is a device used to remove hardness (calcium) from your source water, while a water filter is used to remove all sorts of different contaminants, including iron. So if you’re only looking to remove iron from your water, then a water filter is the way to go.

3. What’s the best way to remove activated carbon from my water?

If you’re wondering how to remove activated carbon from your water source, the answer is that you can’t – it’s not possible.

Activated carbon is a type of filtration media that does precisely what its name says – it “activates” the surface area available for filtration to ensure a maximum amount of contact between water and carbon particles. As a result, activated carbon filters don’t have any moving parts or valves.

4. Is there any way I can remove rust from my well water without having to filter it through an activated carbon filter?

The good news is that there are several ways to remove iron from well water naturally, including by using Vitamin C powder or sand.

However, if you have very high levels of rust in your source water, you might need to invest in a whole house water filter, and they’re able to reduce rust and other contaminants such as chlorine and hydrogen sulfide gas.

5. Is it safe to drink water that’s been treated with Vitamin C?

This is an excellent question because it can argue against using vitamin C as a filtration media (instead of DE, sand, or activated carbon).

The answer is that you will not get sick from drinking water that has been treated with Vitamin C. However, it’s not a good idea to consume large amounts of vitamin C regularly, and doing so can lead to health problems such as kidney stones.

Therefore, if you’re using Vitamin C powder to remove iron from your well water, make sure you only use enough to get the job done. Otherwise, you might be doing more harm than good.

6. What’s the difference between a whole house water filter and a point-of-use water filter?

A whole house water filter is a device that’s installed on the main water line entering your home. This means that all the water that comes into your home through the mainline is filtered.

On the other hand, point-of-use water filters are connected directly to your water source, and they’re usually installed beneath the sink or in the basement of your home. As a result, you can’t use them to filter water for an entire household.

7. How often do I need to change the filter in my water filter?

The frequency with which you’ll need to change the filter in your water filter will depend on various factors, including the type of filter you’re using, the quality of your source water, and how much water you use.

Generally, most filters should be replaced every 6 to 12 months. However, it’s always a good idea to check the manufacturer’s instructions to be sure.

Conclusion

Cheapest ways to remove iron from well water. Water is one of the essential elements in our lives. While it’s safe to drink as long as the levels are not high enough to cause a health risk, having too much of it can be not very pleasant. Fortunately, there are several ways you can remove iron from your well water naturally.

Still, If you’re not sure which one is right for you, consult with a professional first to get their opinion. Thanks for reading!

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